Can Obama count on Dems, labor to win Michigan?

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    Mark BrewerRead what Chronicle editor Bankole Thompson is saying in his weekly front page column for tomorrow’s edition of the Michigan Chronicle about what Democratic voters think about 2012.

    Don’t let Monday night’s CNN/Tea Party Express sponsored Republican candidates debate make you believe that Democrats have it all together for 2012.
        Don’t go to sleep thinking that because Texas Gov. Rick Perry called Social Security a Ponzi scheme during the NBC/Politico debate, and then modified his description of it on Monday to reforming Social Security, the GOP cannot make gains in 2012.
         And If you think President Obama’s visit on Labor Day to Detroit was enough to be the 2012 energizer to get the vote out, think again. You might be making a bet too soon that could bring you the same surprises that we saw last year in November which catapulted Republicans to congressional leadership in the House.
        The bare facts are that Democrats and voter advocates are very concerned about the lackluster attitude from the leadership of their party, some labor groups and the organizing group attached to the Obama campaign in Michigan.
        They are concerned  that the UAW is calling too many shots in the party, which in turn is handicapping the issues the party needs to trumpet for their battleground campaigns. Labor has always and continues to play an important role in the party as its bedrock to help the working class. But the question that remains is whether labor has really delivered through the party when it comes to issues dealing with African Americans and other minority voters. Has the interest of labor always been the interest of African American voters?
        Do they share a common agenda or just some agenda?
        For example, during last year’s election neither the Michigan Democratic Party nor the financially strong UAW made congressional redistricting a major campaign issue to get the vote out. Now  Detroit stands to lose one congressional seat. Who do you blame?

    Read what Chronicle editor Bankole Thompson is saying in his weekly front page column for tomorrow’s edition of the Michigan Chronicle about what Democratic voters think about 2012.

    Don’t let Monday night’s CNN/Tea Party Express sponsored Republican candidates debate make you believe that Democrats have it all together for 2012.

    Don’t go to sleep thinking that because Texas Gov. Rick Perry called Social Security a Ponzi scheme during the NBC/Politico debate, and then modified his description of it on Monday to reforming Social Security, the GOP cannot make gains in 2012.<

    And If you think President Obama’s visit on Labor Day to Detroit was enough to be the 2012 energizer to get the vote out, think again. You might be making a bet too soon that could bring you the same surprises that we saw last year in November which catapulted Republicans to congressional leadership in the House.

    The bare facts are that Democrats and voter advocates are very concerned about the lackluster attitude from the leadership of their party, some labor groups and the organizing group attached to the Obama campaign in Michigan.

    They are concerned  that the UAW is calling too many shots in the party, which in turn is handicapping the issues the party needs to trumpet for their battleground campaigns. Labor has always and continues to play an important role in the party as its bedrock to help the working class. But the question that remains is whether labor has really delivered through the party when it comes to issues dealing with African Americans and other minority voters. Has the interest of labor always been the interest of African American voters?

    Do they share a common agenda or just some agenda?

    For example, during last year’s election neither the Michigan Democratic Party nor the financially strong UAW made congressional redistricting a major campaign issue to get the vote out. Now  Detroit stands to lose one congressional seat. Who do you blame?

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