Social Networking And Blogging Website Twitter

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The #BlackTwitter movement has grown so much in popularity, that major publications are going the extra mile to make sure it’s covered. According to an internal note from the Los Angeles Times, Managing Editor S. Mitra Kalita announced that journalist Dexter Thomas would be joining the team to cover the “Black Twitter” beat and other areas of the digital realm that have a minority focus. Over the course of his career, Thomas has covered topics related to race, technology, and music. He’s also penning a book about the hip-hop scene in Japan. “I want to work with people to tell their own stories, not make things like listcicles on the top 10 things people think about Beyonce’s hair,” he said during a recent interview. “You also see people take tweets on a subject and build an article out of it, and sometimes that’s helpful. But I’m more interested in working with people to tell their stories, using my access to resources that others don’t have.” Read more.


Report: WHO Failed in Ebola Outbreak

A new report claims that the World Health Organization fell short when addressing the Ebola outbreak. A review panel says WHO didn’t take action quickly enough when the virus, which has claimed the lives of over 11,000 people in West Africa, spread to neighboring countries. The Ebola outbreak began in December of 2013, however, WHO took until April 2014 to seriously address the issue. When they did, there were already 1,000 fatalities. The organization has taken responsibility for the delay. “There seems to have been a hope that the crisis could be managed by good diplomacy rather than by scaling up emergency action,” read the report. Read more.


Supermodel Naomi Campbell Talks Racism in Fashion

In the realm of fashion, there still remains a lack of diversity on the runways. Supermodel veteran Naomi Campbell is using her platform to bring these issues to the forefront. Campbell is often recognized as one of the pioneers for Black women in the fashion industry. She graced runways and magazine covers during a time where it was rare to see Black models. “I don’t even like to use the word racism. It’s more territorial-ism. They just don’t want to budge—they don’t want to change their ideas, be more open-minded—to just book a beautiful girl regardless of creed and color,” said Campbell in an interview. “We are not a trend—I didn’t work 28 years for it to be a trend. It shouldn’t have to be that way…. It’s not just only one certain color person walking into your store and buying your clothes. It’s something I won’t stop talking about until I see a bigger improvement.” Read more.

PHOTO CREDIT: Getty

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