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According to The National Institute for Literacy, roughly half of Detroit’s adults are “functionally illiterate” – they are lacking basic skills necessary for sustainable employment including reading, speaking, writing and computational skills. Furthermore, Detroiter’s high school diploma and GED rates are staggering. This education level can trap adults and their families in poverty.

Those looking to break through that cycle can benefit from Education Recovery, a free literacy and GED program hosted by Goodwill Industries of Greater Detroit’s Flip the Script division. Goodwill Detroit welcomes all Detroit/ Wayne County, low-income residents (ages of 16-30) who are committed to positive life, academic and social change to call 313-557-4818 to join the Education Recovery Program.

“Goodwill Detroit is known for: keeping the promises it makes and it willingness to stand by to assist those who are seriously committed to helping themselves,” said Keith Bennett, Flip the Script director. “To date, we have helped a number of men and women break the poverty cycle through literacy and GED attainment.”

Goodwill Detroit’s Education Recovery program is an education program that allows enrollees to work at their own pace to break down unemployment barriers. For six to 12 weeks, students can attend classes on Monday thru Thursday from 3pm-7:30pm for education in reading, math and social studies. The end goal is GED certification and improved literacy – as most students come in with a 3rd -5th grade reading level and some are completely illiterate. Goodwill Detroit understands that some students and potential students may have transportation barriers to attending Education Recovery classes. Therefore bus tickets and other services are provided for those as needed.

“When you can read, you can dream; when you can learn, you can earn; when you know better, you can do better,” said Bennett. “These are the three pillars that drive Goodwill Detroit’s Flip the Script and Education Recovery. We’re looking forward to welcoming new students each day who are focused on life changes.”

 

 

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