Happy professor talking to female student during computer class.

The second installment of The Whiteness Project was released today, and trust us, it’s worth your time.

The beauty of America lies in everyone’s differences, but as we’re all aware, being different can also quite literally shorten your life span by decades in this country. In the video series, White millennials with intersecting identities (not pictured above) talk about the advantages of growing up White, the “one-drop” rule, and their own prejudices against Black people.

“A rich White person is not going to admit that being White helped them become who they are, ’cause they take a lot of pride in the fact that their family may have not been rich to begin with, and are now rich. When I got my job, for example, I walked in there and I just looked clean cut, White person – and they hired me pretty much because of that and it’s just small things that no one really notices, but life’s a little bit easier being White, I think,” says one insightful male participant.

The Whiteness Project finds that 78 percent of millenials say everyone has a responsibility to help tackle bias.

Another participant speaks on her experience as a person of mixed race who was always told to check the African-American box on applications. She also adds that her mom has made comments like, “The way you are on Facebook makes you seem like you’re Black.

Mashable says of the series:

Filmmaker Whitney Dow, who is also an educator and research scholar at Columbia University’s Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE), confesses that people have been critical of his decision to center the race conversation on white experience. But he defends his stance, explaining that white allies can be most effective when they take an introspective approach and challenge themselves. Many white millennial allies think their job is to right the wrongs of other people, rather than looking inward and thinking of how structural racism impacts their own life and changing that,” he says.

As for the second installment, Dow decided to dig a little deeper:

“Many white millennial allies think their job is to right the wrongs of other people, rather than looking inward and thinking of how structural racism impacts their own life and changing that,” he says. As a result, this second installment includes white people who have intersecting identities, including biracial, multiracial, non-binary and transgender identities. This intersectional approach prompted interviewees to discuss how the world perceives them, as well as who they feel they are.

Watch three videos from the second installment over at Mashable, and leave your thoughts below. One participant says that right now being a White Christian in America is the “hardest thing” to be, before he goes on to reference recent racial incidents while adding, “White people are misunderstood and put into bad situations like that, like Ferguson…”

He also notes, “I don’t hate Black people, but some things about them irritate me as whole.” Talk about hard to listen to.

SOURCE: Mashable | PHOTO CREDIT: Getty

Millennials Talk About White Privilege, The One-Drop Rule, & Intersecting Identities For “The Whiteness Project” was originally published on globalgrind.com

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