Flint Water Crisis-1-47

Emergency Service Agreement to be extended without an increase in charges

 The Great Lakes Water Authority (GLWA) board voted to extend its emergency service agreement with the city of Flint for an additional year without an increase in charges through the term of the agreement.

 

“This tragedy continues to increase costs for a city that is experiencing a public health emergency, and we want to reassure residents the GLWA will not increase costs to them through the term of the city’s agreement with us,” said Sue McCormick, CEO, GLWA. “As a larger, established system, we have the ability to hold the line on charges for Flint in light of the public health situation they are facing.”

 

The GLWA is committed to the reliable delivery of safe, quality water through its five water treatment plants, hundreds of miles of transmission mains, and highly qualified, expert water quality engineers and other staff.

The Great Lakes Water Authority (GLWA) was established in November 2014 to provide water and waste water services to 126 municipalities in seven Southeastern Michigan counties. On January 1, 2016, GLWA assumed operational, infrastructure improvements, environmental compliance and budget-setting responsibilities for the regional water and sewage treatment plants, major water transmission mains and sewage interceptors, and related facilities. The organization leases these facilities from the City of Detroit for an allocation of $50 million per year to fund capital improvements for the City of Detroit retail system and/or debt obligations. GLWA also funds a Water Residential Assistance Program to assist low-income residential customers throughout the system. The GLWA board includes one representative each from Oakland, Macomb and Wayne counties as well as two representatives from the City of Detroit, and one from the State of Michigan to represent customer communities outside the tri-county area.

 

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