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Vic Mensa has managed to transform himself from a local Chicago kid rapper to one of the voices of a generation.

Being cosigned by Kanye West has inspired the young rapper to go deeper with his songwriting abilities—including speaking out on issues such as police brutality and the Flint water crisis.

In the latest issue of Entertainment Weekly, the 23-year-old emcee dished on some of the stories behind his most popular and memorable lyrics:

“U Mad” feat. Kanye West

The lyrics: “Hater, please let me live my life, swear to God I be tryna do right/But if she bad I might hit a bitch in the elevator like Ray Rice.”

The story: ”With that line, I just went too far. I was at a point when I had forgotten a sense of responsibility to the people listening and to myself. I more or less was just feeling like, ‘Let me say whatever the f—k I want, whatever’s going to get a [gasps].’ It was a learning experience. It really made me remember how I’ve always approached rap music from a perspective of truth and importance. There was a lapse with that line.”

“Wolves” (Kanye West feat. Vic Mensa and Sia)

The lyrics: “Don’t fly so high/Your wings might melt, you’re much too good to be true/I’m just bad for you”

The story: “It’s about being a star, especially as someone unexpected to do so: a black kid from the South Side of Chicago. Icarus flew too close to the sun, he was so ambitious, but can you really blame him? They tell you that you can’t do things your whole life. They tell you rapping is not a profession, try to get a job, go to college. The idea of going as high as you can, with the possibility that it could all crash and burn, inspired the line.”

 

For more, head over to Entertainment Weekly.

SOURCE: EW | PHOTO CREDIT: Getty 

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