man-on-the-run

Catch me if you can.

You might have said that once, giggling. You may have yelled it at a game one afternoon. You said it, maybe, in a flirtatious manner on some romantic evening. Run, run, run, catch me if you can because, as in “Man on the Run” by Carl Weber, this chase may keep a man out of prison.

The night Kyle Richmond learned that his best friend, Jay Crawford, had busted out of prison was unusually memorable: Kyle and his wife were naked in their hot tub when U.S. Marshalls broke in and surprised them. The feds were sure that Jay had contacted Richmond, in search of money and a place to hide.

The Marshalls had shown up at Wil Duncan’s office that afternoon, too, but they quickly learned that Wil didn’t know where Jay was. Wil was best friends with his boy, Jay, for years, but that didn’t mean he was a regular visitor at the prison. Truth: he hadn’t seen Jay in ages. No, Wil had enough problems, with his job and his powerful uncle putting the pressure on him to join the “family business.”

Jay’s other best friend, Allen, wasn’t visited by the U.S. Marshalls—maybe because he’d never gone to see Jay in prison. He had his hands full just keeping his beautiful wife, Cassie, happy, so instead, Allen anonymously put money in Jay’s commissary fund and sent him gifts, but his name was not tied to the criminal Jay Crawford.

It was quite a surprise that Jay showed up on Allen’s doorstep, looking for help.

Ten years ago, Jay was accused of raping a woman, but she’d set him up. He was innocent and because of that, he wasn’t about to take the rap for anything, even if it meant parole—and so, he escaped from prison instead. He figured he could count on his three best friends to help a guy out.

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