After a seven-year absence, the Detroit Department of Public Works (DPW) has re-launched its residential street sweeping program. The last time residential side streets were swept citywide was 2010, before the service was stopped due to city budget cuts.
Mayor Mike Duggan announced during his state of the City address in February that the street sweeping program would resume in May. Now it has. With several new street sweepers added to its fleet, crews have begun the first of three planned annual sweeps of over 2000 miles of neighborhood residential streets, starting in northeast Detroit in District 3.
The improved service is possible thanks to an increase in state transportation funding associated with the passage of the 2015 Roads bill. The city has allocated $3.2 million this year to the program.
Department of Public Works crews will sweep 100 curb miles (330 blocks) a day of Detroit residential streets. Each sweeping cycle of the city will take approximately 10 weeks (depending on weather) and will move across the city, generally from east to west. A map showing when areas of the city are expected to be swept is available at http://www.detroitmi.gov/PublicWorks.
The launch of the street sweeping effort coincides with the annual Motor City Makeover program, which runs the first three Saturdays in May. This year theme is Motor City Makeover 365, emphasizing the many efforts by city workers and residents alike to clean and beautify the city every day.
“We are thrilled to be able to re-institute a service like this, which reaches every neighborhood and helps keep our city clean year-round, said Ron Brundidge, Director of DPW. “We’ve added new street sweepers to our fleet and hired additional machine operators to ensure that we are fully staffed for the re-launch of this program.”
To assist in notifying residents as to when their scheduled sweeping will occur, the department will post signs requesting no parking 48 hours prior to a sweeping. It will be important that residents adhere to posted No Parking signs to ensure machines have access to streets for proper cleaning.Click here to see the street sweeping schedule.

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