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WASHINGTON — Members of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. announced the organization is taking a formal stance against the growing gun violence issues in America. The historically Black Greek letter organization held a press conference Wednesday morning on the steps of their national headquarters in Washington, D.C.

“We are not opposed to the Second Amendment — but we are staunch advocates for responsible gun ownership and gun use who support the passage of sensible gun control measures in this country,” said National President and CEO Beverly Smith.

“This is not a partisan problem, but a problem that affects all of us,” Smith added. “We have long held the position that we as a nation can save thousands of innocent lives through common sense measures.

The sorority is calling for:

closing private loopholes for gun purchases

universal background checks;

a three day waiting period for gun purchases;

raising the gun purchase age to 21 years old;

limiting the amount of rounds of ammunition a magazine can fire; and

banning civil ownership of assault military ranked weapons.

The organization also wants the Centers for Disease Control to look into America’s gun violence as a public health issue.

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The Tennessee Waffle House shooting claimed the life of De’Ebony Groves, 21, left, and Sharita Henderson, 24, was critically injured. The 2015 Charleston church shooting claimed the life of Myra Thompson, a 59-year-old Bible study teacher at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in downtown Charleston, S.C.

The call to action comes weeks after a deadly mass shooting at a Middle Tennessee Waffle House claimed the life of one of the members of the sorority and injured another.

De’Ebony Groves, 21, died from gunshot wounds.

Sharita Henderson was critically injured.

Smith also expressed condolences for the loss of Charleston church shooting victim and sorority member Myra Thompson. The 59-year-old Bible study teacher was killed in the 2015 shooting at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in downtown Charleston, South Carolina.

“It is a really sad place for a nation when it cannot protect its children. When it can not protect its seniors” said U.S. Rep. Marcia L. Fudge (D-Ohio).

I work in a Congress where the people have absolutely no backbone. If they did, they would do what is right,” Fudge added.

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